Exciting Trailers for Boring Subjects #rubberonionbattle

Not gonna lie… when I heard what the topic was for August, I was like, WTF am I going to do? Luckily, my wife is really good at thinking up stuff like this, so I turned to her and said, “Hey, the battle topic for this month is Exciting Trailers for Boring Subjects, help?” And she said, “Watching paint dry.” Boom. Done.

So, whose paint dried faster? Answer: They tied! The paint dried at exactly the same time. Purple is happy with sharing the victory. Orange wants a rematch. Perhaps we’ll see them again in a future battle.

One thing that I’m still not sure about with this one: In the video, the orange paint goes on the left side of the wall, and the purple paint goes on the right side of the wall. After the timer starts, there is a cut to the two painters watching their paint dry. Since it’s a point-of-view shot, the color scheme is reversed: Purple on the left, Orange on the right. I didn’t know if I should have kept purple on the right and orange on the left for consistency, or switch them for an accurate POV shot. I ended up switching them because watching it back with them un-switched made me feel funny. I wonder if that determines other people’s editing decisions.

I’d be curious to know if this made things confusing for viewers, or if it mattered.

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5 comments

  1. Rediskot · August 24, 2016

    I don’t think the switch confused me. The colours are so dominant that when you flip from the wall to the guys seeing the colour sides reversed made perfect sense from the wall’s POV. Maybe that’s just me. After watching it roughly 7 times I still don’t remember which side was where, so maybe it doesn’t even matter? I mean for all we know the purple guy might’ve been using orange paint, hoping to lose, proving that purple is superior! A kind of reverse competition? Either way the timing and their poses are just great. My baby appears to like it too 🙂

    • Cranky Muse Projects · August 24, 2016

      Excellent, thanks for the feedback! My instinct was to go with the POV, and my brain got in the way – typical – and I overthought it. I’m glad I went with the instinct! And I LOVE that your baby likes it #achievementunlocked 🙂

  2. Stephen Brooks · August 24, 2016

    Loved it! And it’s funny you brought up the flip because I was going to bring that up. This is a really hard choice to make because there is no angle where you can put the “camera” to keep the character colors on the same side (other than never seeing the characters from the front. The reason being that cinematically the line between the subjects is actually between the wall and the character since that’s what they’re interacting with. The only solution would’ve been to have a two shot where you see the wall and the characters at the same time which would’ve established the area better but it would’ve ruined the timing (that western gunslinger showdown back-and-forth smash cutting) in the 15 seconds you had. If there were another 5 seconds to play with you could’ve put it after the eye twitch shot.

    So the short answer is that your solution was correct. The colors were far enough on the wheel that everything made sense… and the story point of the scene was that the characters were watching the paint on the wall – so the interaction was with the wall and not themselves – that makes the camera being 180 on the line make sense. I’ll talk about it on next month’s show but it’s a really interesting problem to solve and you solved it naturally! Well done (=

  3. rubberonion · August 24, 2016

    Loved it! And it’s funny you brought up the flip because I was going to bring that up. This is a really hard choice to make because there is no angle where you can put the “camera” to keep the character colors on the same side (other than never seeing the characters from the front. The reason being that cinematically the line between the subjects is actually between the wall and the character since that’s what they’re interacting with. The only solution would’ve been to have a two shot where you see the wall and the characters at the same time which would’ve established the area better but it would’ve ruined the timing (that western gunslinger showdown back-and-forth smash cutting) in the 15 seconds you had. If there were another 5 seconds to play with you could’ve put it after the eye twitch shot.

    So the short answer is that your solution was correct. The colors were far enough on the wheel that everything made sense… and the story point of the scene was that the characters were watching the paint on the wall – so the interaction was with the wall and not themselves – that makes the camera being 180 on the line make sense. I’ll talk about it on next month’s show but it’s a really interesting problem to solve and you solved it naturally! Well done (=

    • Cranky Muse Projects · August 24, 2016

      Awesome, thank you!! I really appreciate the analysis… it helps me clarify *why* I did the thing that my instinct told me to do. This is where outside feedback is crucial… I really seem to like those POV shots in my work, and they make sense to me when I’m sketching things out, but I can’t climb outside of the conception of my own stuff to see how it lands for someone with fresh eyes. Information is power!

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